McDonald's Le Charolais

Happy National Cheeseburger Day! Apparently, it's also Happy Get Groped near a McDonald's by a Guy Resembling Rob Pilatus Day, which if I'd known about in advance, would have surrounded myself with bikini models and Sinclair Sexsmith, but you live and you learn, I suppose. And get touched by strangers, but that's all in the past now. But everyone knows that the objectification of women goes best with a side of fries, so here's Le Charolais, McDo's answer to the McDouble back home.

Surprisingly enough, McDo also has the McDouble and McChicken in addition to this little gem, but this is for when you're feeling classy and want a burger to go with your McMacarons and McEspresso, both of which exist and are embarrassingly delicious. I initially thought that "Charolais" was one of those corporate neologisms designed to be a hybrid of "charred" and something Franco-sounding and chic, but to my surprise, my two-dollar burger has origin, baby, and champion origins at that, sourced from Ireland and the south of France. The Charolais cattle are a noble, prize-winning purebred line who would likely be ashamed to discover that they've been made into something eaten by me.

In addition to a pedigree, the Charolais has PGI-protected French Emmental cheese, lettuce, and a Dijon-pepper sauce on a fresh miniature ciabatta. This has more "local" food keywords than most Brooklyn restaurants, and it's got the flavor to prove it. Almost every component is flavorful, with a distinct, defined sharpness unusual to fast food. Normally, food like this is enjoyed for its monolithic, consistent properties. After all, a Big Mac is the same in every language, but this is another story entirely.
For its low price point, this is excellent. Any pricier, though, and I'd have been a little peeved. The quality didn't match up with the ingredients. The cheese stood out the most, with a very nutty, slightly sweet note. The mustard and pepper sauce was tangy and strong and despite its modest quantity, went a long way in enhancing the burger. Unfortunately, the beef was so overshadowed by its accompanying components that they swallowed it completely. Letting it stand for itself was a noble goal, but regrettably a failure in execution. It was drastically underseasoned and dry. And the components were delicious, but didn't quite come together with the same level of syzygy of the McDouble. I'd try this again, and use it as a tool to blow people's minds, but for a consistent sandwich, would stick to my old favorite. Sometimes the classics win out!

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